Stanford study first to show antibodies involved in nerve repair in injuries

Antibodies — warrior proteins the immune system makes to defend the body against invading pathogens such as viruses and bacteria — have a gentler side nobody knew about until now: They function not only as soldiers but also as nurses. And researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine now think antibodies’ absence in the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) may be a key part of the reason why nerve damage there doesn’t get naturally repaired in humans. That insight could someday lead to new treatments for stroke and spinal-cord trauma. Continue reading Stanford study first to show antibodies involved in nerve repair in injuries

Neurologists Come Together to Tackle Charcot-Marie-Tooth

(From the University of Rochester Medical Center.) Neurologists around the nation are working together in a nationwide study focusing on Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a painful nerve condition that affects more than 100,000 Americans. The team and its Inherited Neuropathies Consortium is Continue reading Neurologists Come Together to Tackle Charcot-Marie-Tooth

Variety appeal to set Chantelle Lawrence free

by Josephine Gillespie for The Queensland Times At only 13, Chantelle Lawrence has already seen the inside of more hospitals than most people will in a lifetime. Born with a rare progressive neuromuscular condition known as Dejerine-Sottas Syndrome, Chantelle has Continue reading Variety appeal to set Chantelle Lawrence free

Girl with Dejerine-Sottas receives Children of Courage award

From the Macedon Ranges Leader, by Barry Kennedy: CARLSRUHE’S Amber Jepsen has a growing set of hobbies including horse riding, playing the keyboard, card games, drawing, painting and writing. The seven-year-old is confident she will be a famous author and Continue reading Girl with Dejerine-Sottas receives Children of Courage award